Tag Archives: T/N/R

Facebook Bingo

Do you like to play Bingo? Would you like to play from the comfort of your home? If so, look no further and you will be supporting a good cause too!

For the month of October, we are running an online Bingo on our fundraising Facebook page, The Cat Purrse. All proceeds will go to the neutering of stray and feral cats in West Waterford.

To take part, it’s easy. Buy your card(s) online here (€2 per card or €10 for a sheet of 6 cards). We will email you a photo of your card, which you will need to print. Follow The Cat Purrse page where every day we will be announcing the drawn numbers from the 17th of October. We will be playing for a line, 2 lines and a full house. For more information, click here.

Here are the prizes you can choose from…

if you win a line

if you win two lines

if you win a full house

Note that postage will be at your charge if collection cannot be arranged locally (East Cork area).

Launching National Feral Cat Awareness Week 2016

feral cat weekFrom the 8th to the 14th of August, we will be celebrating National Feral Cat Awareness Week, an initiative from Feral Cats Ireland. Throughout the week, some vets across the country will offer discounted rates for the neutering of feral cats. Most importantly, this is a week to raise awareness about the plight of feral cats and about the solution to the issue of cat over-population: TNR (Trap-Neuter-Return).

The small group of volunteers at Community Cats Network will, as always, be busy trapping cats for neutering, but throughout the week, we will attempt to post some information about caring for feral cats and about how YOU can make a difference and help to solve the problem. Raising awareness is key as, at the origin of the problem, is not only a set of old-fashioned attitudes towards cat care, but most importantly a lack of information about how feral cats can be helped and enjoy better lives. It is down to every one of us to spread the word about TNR programmes and about the benefits of neutering and we count on you in this endeavour.

CCN TNR Info poster

We will be launching the week with two information stalls in Maxi Zoo on the 6th of August, one in the Midleton store, the other in the Douglas store. We hope you can join us for a chat on the day and will be happy to share information about the work we do with you.

4th Birthday Celebrations

16 CCN Birthday banner

compOn the 27th of April, we are celebrating four years of helping cats in Cork county and beyond. To mark this event and to thank you for your support, we are having some fun competitions on our Facebook page with loads of little goodies to be won. Join the fun and help us to celebrate in style!

You can also enter our Birthday Raffle and be in with a chance to win one of these lovely prizes. Tickets are €2 each, €5 for 3 tickets, €10 for 8 tickets. Donations can be made here. The draw will take place on the 29th of April at 9pm and winners will be announced online. Note that if collection cannot be arranged, postage will be at your charge.

Thanks for your support!

Birthday raffle 2016

Postponed: Raffle in Fermoy

16 04 02 Fermoy

**We are very sorry to say that our raffle in Fermoy has to be postponed. We will keep you updated with the new date.**

Join us for a great raffle held in aid of CCN at Cheers Bar in Fermoy on the 2nd of April. There will be plenty of prizes sponsored by local businesses to be won! Great craic guaranteed! More details can be found here.

All proceeds will go towards the neutering of stray and feral cats in Fermoy.

We’d like to thank Cheers Bar for hosting the event, all the businesses who kindly sponsored prizes and all of you who supported!

Win Two Tickets for Sharon Shannon’s Concert

How would you like to win a pair of tickets to see Sharon Shannon live at Cyprus Avenue in Cork on the 15th of April 2016?

16 04 10 Mitchelstown

To enter the draw, just make a donation here (€2 per line or €5 for 3 lines). The draw will take place on the 10th of April at 9pm and the winner will be announced on our Facebook page. All proceeds will go towards the cost of neutering of stray and feral cats in Mitchelstown.

The more lines you buy, the better your chances to win and the more cats we can help!

We thank you in advance for your support! We would like to thank CARE Rescue for their kind donation to help cats in Mitchelstown!

Read-a-thon: Hour 10

“When a man loves cats, I am his friend and comrade, without further introduction.” – Mark Twain from Who Is Mark Twain?

Twain when-a-man-loves-cats

It is now early morning here in Ireland. You are possibly switching on the kettle, or maybe are you still awake finishing last night’s book, and you will have a little snooze before you start another day of reading.

So why are you doing that? And why do we do what we do? Where is the money you’re raising going to go?

Community Cats Network is a Trap-Neuter-Return organisation. There is a huge problem of cat over-population in Ireland and we believe that by neutering stray and feral cats we can significantly reduce the suffering of many unwanted kittens and cats in general. Although rescuing cats and kittens is a very kind action, it is not actually solving the problem of over-population, whereas by neutering cats and having them monitored, you can effectively prevent much suffering. like everything in these days and ages, neutering cost money and it is a deterrent for people to have the cats they feed neutered. These cats belong to nobody and to everybody at once, but very few are willing to take responsibility for them. Our volunteers have decided to donate their time to help these cats and change people’s attitude towards the neutering of cats; the money you raise with this read-a-thon will go to helping us to have them neutered and cared for.

This weekend we want to celebrate cats, we want to celebrate reading and we invite you to join us in this celebration. You can take part in the event by registering here before noon, you can sponsor our participants, or you can just follow what is going on and interact with us to raise more awareness. Every little helps!

Now, let’s go back to reading and to what the readers who have taken up the challenge are up to!

Tell us, have you been reading non-stop so far? Or have you had a little catnap or a proper sleep before getting back to reading?

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A Special Appeal: TNR Saves Lives!

TNR appeal

We have reached a critical time of the year. People are contacting us from everywhere asking for help with rehoming kittens, but there are simply not enough homes. The mothers are now pregnant with their 2nd (if not 3rd) litter this year. They are exhausted already and their kittens will be born in bad weather; most of them will end up dying in suffering.

How can we help? 
Our few volunteers are out there, every week, trapping cats to be neutered, thus preventing so much suffering. We do as much as we can physically do and are always glad to offer our time. The problem is that the bills have to be paid and although carers may be able to afford paying for a few cats to be neutered, it’s a totally different story when there are 10, 15, even 20 cats to be neutered. As much as possible we try to organise fundraisers to help out, but our community funds are running low and we are very limited in the number of cats we can help. At the moment, we have a few projects on hold, simply because the funds are not there: 12 cats in Doneraile, 16 in Castletownroche, 17 in Cahir, 15 in Wilton, and so on. Meanwhile, the cats keep breeding…

How can you help?
Carers have contacted us and have agreed to have the cats TNRed and to keep feeding them. They have also agreed to cover some of the cost of neutering, but we need more funds for these projects to go ahead. By donating a few euros today, you will be preventing the suffering of hundreds of kittens tomorrow and improving the lives of so many cats.
By donating a few euros today, you will not be saving 1 life, but 100’s of lives!

Please, help your community cats and donate to one of our community funds today!

Thank you for your support!

– North Cork fund: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr…
– Cork city fund: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr…
– Tipperary fund: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr…
– Waterford fund: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr…
– West Cork fund: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr…
– East Cork fund: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr…

In the Shadow of the Mill

in the shadow of the Mill

The cats would pour out of the old mill in a torrent of upraised tails when the women appeared. Every evening, after 6 o clock, when the businesses had closed for the day and things quietened down, the ladies would come with their meagre supplies of food, held in burlap, potato bags, to feed the forgotten cats. The cats were generationally wild. Litter upon litter of these cats were born in and around the old mill, which itself had been built just after the famine in Ireland. The nursing queens, the female cats with kittens, made their nests deep within the hidden places of the mill where humans would not discover them or their babies. From these dens a struggle for survival was forced upon the tiny kittens, born blind, born deaf, completely dependent on their mothers for life, these tiny creatures had to undergo a veritable gauntlet of challenges just to emerge from their nests. They were in danger of being attacked by rival Tomcats who wished to mate with their mothers. The rats that infested the mill were a considerable source of threat and would happily seize and eat any newborn kitten. Then there were the endemic diseases; cat flu that first blinded the babies and then sealed their nasal passages shut leaving the tiny, fledging cats, to starve to death, unable to smell their food source. Then there were the truly horrible diseases whose lethality was hidden by their innocuous acronyms; FeLV , FIV, FIE, an entire alphabet that spelled nothing but a miserable end for newborns that had not yet left the nest. But the single biggest danger the cats faced were human beings whose indifference, neglect, and downright cruelty, ensured that the suffering would continue in an endless cycle.

‘So as you treat the least of my creatures, so you treat me’ or words to that effect. How many times did I listen to the priest intone those words at Sunday mass. The congregation sat in various states of emotion, that ranged from utter and complete boredom, to rapt, face gleaming attention , as the weekly ritual of the catholic mass unfolded. The message was always the same; ‘Behave, Be Good, Be Kind towards those weaker than you’. And how often these admonishments were left behind in the church along with the Parish Bulletins and unread catholic papers. ‘Things were different back then’ or so it is said by today’s commentators. Ireland in the early 1960s. Back then we were all catholic, republican, and played GAA. Those that didn’t fit that description were all English. Rugby playing, Protestant, heathens, Communists, and Atheists. We all had to fit within very narrow job titles. To step outside the definition was to invite ridicule.

I was a very small child when I first noticed the Mother and Daughter. They quietly walked along the quay side by side. Clutched in their hands were potato bags filled with discarded food waste and scraps, collected from the Town’s businesses during the day. They always went to the high entrance gates of the mill where they distributed the food to the feral cats that boiled out of everywhere. To be honest the women frightened me at first. The Mother seemed to have a stern face, a ‘cross’ face as children like me would see it. Back then the ability to gauge the temperament of an adult from his/her face was a survival requirement for kids. Ireland was not a child friendly country then. The Daughter disquieted me even more. As a child I couldn’t articulate what it was, exactly, about her that made me stare so hard.

When the two women reached the gates of the mill they were first greeted by the ‘waiters’ the cats who knew they were coming. But within a few minutes the cats and kittens poured out of the mill, from every direction, frantic for the food the women had to offer. These felines were the wildest of the wild yet they greeted the two women with great love and dignity every time. The Mother and Daughter went about their feeding amidst a forest of upright tails whose tips were turned over in that classic, inverted ‘J’ shape, of cordial cat greeting. I remember pausing to watch the women and the cats who rubbed up against their legs and twined sinuously around the women’s ankles. I was jealous of the obvious love the cats had for these two women because I never received any attention from any of these wild creatures. No matter how often I approached them, the cats either totally ignored me, or, worse again, hissed and spat, before running away into their dark and mysterious hiding places within the mill. The two women spoke to the cats. Called them by pet names and the cats responded. The big adult males, bruisers all, would get the first cut from the food supplies followed by the sleeker females. In between this roiling mass of women and cats would dart the kittens, braving blows and hisses from the adults, but determined to get their share of what was on offer. The Mother and Daughter did their best to control the feeding and to ensure that even the littlest kitten got something to eat. The big bullies would be chased away and space made for a kitten to get a morsel to eat but the bigger, faster cats, always got the lions share. When the feeding was done the two women would leave, side by side, and just as sedately, walk away back down the quay. The cats would linger by the gates awhile longer hunting for any remaining scraps before they too would silently merge back into the shadow of the mill.

I grew up with cats. We had a little grey Tabby called, ‘Puisin’ (Pro. Pusheen) which is Gaelic for, ‘Little Cat’. As a child, I discovered Puisin had given birth to a litter of kittens in the bathroom cupboard. My father promptly dispatched the kittens by placing them in a cotton wool lined shoebox that was impregnated with chloroform. I still remember the frantic cries of these newborn kittens and their puny efforts to escape their fate within the shoebox. Poor Puisin would run about the house crying for her kittens and trying desperately to free them from the box but the humans always won and the kittens died. I suppose this is shocking for some readers but in 1960s, rural Ireland, this was an outrageously expensive way of disposing of unwanted kittens. Why go to all that trouble and spend all that money when there was a perfectly good river nearby? Discovering bags of drowned kittens was a frequent childhood experience and one consequence of playing in the river. The county council street cleaners, a particularly villainous looking bunch of men who went around the town in a horse drawn cart always had a few dead cats tied to the side of their cart. Then there was the bodies of cats and kittens. They were everywhere to be found. Lying in hedges and ditches. In back alleys and side streets. A cat that was dying of disease or that was unable to move because of injury, was considered fair game for a sport of kill the cat. Cruelty didn’t come into it. This was the weak and unfortunate of society, the people of the margins, discovering something even more weaker and defenceless than themselves. They could cause pain and torment to an animal, secure in the knowledge that society wouldn’t seek retribution for their crime. Some might describe this as cruelty but it was the pain filled, and the tortured, inflicting suffering on another, ‘lesser’ living thing, in order to relieve their personal pain. It was tough at the bottom in those days.

It’s hard to break the era of a story but I have to jump forward many years to finish the tale. The two women continued to feed the feral cats at the mill. Year upon year, as the country about them changed, the Mother and Daughter made their daily walk of mercy bringing food and kindness to the abandoned and forgotten cats of the mill. I grew older and away from the town following my own path in life. The mother grew older too, inevitably, and then she passed away leaving her daughter alone to carry on the task. As a man, I passed the mill one day and there was the daughter, alone, feeding the cats. As always the cats milled about her feet, tails aloft, meowing and chirping, happy to see her and the food she brought. As usual a few ‘young fellas’who were passing, paused to shout some undecipherable catcalls at the girl as she cared for her charges. I was now big enough to shout back at them and told them to be on their way. They informed me that the Daughter was, in their words, “Fucking mad” . So what? That what was almost the entire town thought of the Mother and Daughter and used to go out of their way to let them know. Who but imbeciles would go to so much trouble to feed a bunch of useless cats? And do the task year upon year upon year? As I saw off the hectoring youths a series of images I had unconsciously collected through the years began to form a pattern in my mind. I looked closely at the daughter as she bent to her task, especially at her face. The same calm, almost serene smile was still there, as it always had been, but the face lacked the animation of thoughtful intelligence. The Daughters actions were stiff and slow. Even simple tasks seemed an effort. The girl obviously suffered from some sort of intellectual disability. Yet the love and kindness, both the abilty and desire to reach out to other creatures, that her Mother had inculcated in her, remained, even though her devoted Mother was gone.

Once upon a time the Mother was a beautiful young woman who married a man and together they produced a baby girl. I know the Mother was a beautiful woman because even as a child I could see the remains of that beauty. The child was born with an intellectual disability and into a time in Ireland when such births were viewed as a mark of God’s disfavour upon the Mother. The husband, unable to face the shame of such a thing and the inevitable public comment, abandoned his beautiful wife and baby daughter to their fate. Now, to add to the ‘shame’ of the baby was the humiliation of desertion and the desperation of being a single parent in a society that heaped opprobrium upon such families. Mother and Daughter lived in poverty for all of their lives. That poverty was evident in their clothes that never changed year after year, becoming more dowdy and repaired as time passed. The Mother and Daughter seemed to pass through the streets unnoticed and friendless. The shopkeepers knew them because they collected the waste food everyday but no passerby ever seemed to stop and engage in casual conversation with them. Yet every evening Mother and Daughter walked serenely along the dark quay, laden with potato bags that contained precious food, for the forgotten cats that lived such short lives in the old mill. Ignoring the taunts and jeers of the town they fed, and cared, for hundreds of cats.

A number of years ago I passed the mill and there was the daughter feeding the cats. She had a companion with her, another woman who appeared slightly embarrassed to be standing in the middle of a lot of cats. That was the Daughter’s carer, appointed by a state agency to look after the Motherless girl. Then, one day, the Daughter was gone as were the mill and all its cats. In its place was a block of apartments, the kind advertised as ‘Contemporary living in an historic setting’.

Today we have Rescue Groups and TNR groups. There is a much wider public acceptance of animal welfare issues. Animal cruelty is a crime as is any harmful actions towards children or those with intellectual disabilities. Single parents are no different from two parents. There are laws to prevent all kinds of injustices in our society. But I walk the quay now as an older man with memories of another time and another place. If I look hard enough I see them coming towards me, a woman with her daughter. The Mother has a kind, compassionate face and she walks with her Daughter at her side. They walk, bound by love, bound by sadness, to a place where their children await them, eager for whatever scraps of food and human kindness the two women can offer them. They walk unheeding of the taunts, and jeers, that greet them most evenings from townspeople whose tiny intellects cannot fathom that love itself is a journey all of us must walk, regardless of the circumstances we find ourselves in. And if we can love something other than ourselves, no matter what the circumstances we find ourselves in, than something good and kind and eternal will emerge and live on after we are gone. For the Mother and Daughter, unknownst to themselves, and to me, planted a seed that lay dormant a long time. And then came the spring and the seed began to sprout. Community Cats Network will commence the neutering of every stray and feral cat in Bandon town in the memory of the forgotten mother and daughter.

” For one small act of kindness can inspire others to go on to do greater things”

The Bandon TNR project has been ongoing for some time and we have already neutered some 500 cats and kittens in the town and its hinterland. This project has been funded in part by the Hairy Project. We humbly and gratefully acknowledge and thank those of you that donated goods for auction and those of you that bid on the items for sale. CCN will be running its, PURRFECT AUCTION, soon, in order to raise the bulk of funds required to complete the Bandon TNR. CCN calculates it will take between 2-3 years to complete the neutering of the estimated 2000-2500 remaining cats.

Many Thanks

Our next Purrfect Auction will take place this coming Thursday the 30th of July to August 9th. Click here to join us for some goodies and fun. Our Chief Auctioneer will be Annie Brabazon again, we are all looking forward to some good fun and of course shopping!!

Click here if you would like to donate directly to this project.

Volunteers in the Spotlight: Pat and David

We have asked our volunteers to tell us a bit about their experience of volunteering with CCN, what is their motivation, what do they do and whether they find it rewarding.

Here is what Pat and David have to say…

Eleven years ago we moved to Ireland together with our two cats.   Within a few months our first “stray” arrived and I fed her;  she was already pregnant and produced five kittens in the barn next door. We managed to trap them all eventually and had them neutered.  They became The Outside Cats.  I very soon realised what a terrible problem Ireland had with feral/stray/dumped cats and, as and when one turned up needing food, it was duly fed and as soon as possible taken to our vet.  Trying to trap cats without proper equipment was a nightmare and veterinary fees costly.  Some strays were too sick to come back from the vet, four went to new homes and tragically two have been killed on the road. 

We knew it was absolutely vital to do what we could and at that time there was no Community Cats Network to turn to for help. 

CCN has changed the lives of hundreds of cats and saved thousands of kittens from being born to a life of misery and suffering.  Although our input is small we are proud to be associated with CCN and to do what we can.  We collect anything useful for car boots and stalls and enlisted the help of a friend who makes wonderful little catnip mice to sell!  We have looked for (and found!) hidden goodies in our attics and buy small items which are suitable for prizes.  I helped with the Youghal Street Collection for the last two years.  CCN held a Bingo Night in Youghal last October;  I made cakes and sandwiches and my husband, David,  found himself voted in as Bingo Master for the event, where an amazing amount was raised for the Youghal cats.  We put leaflets and posters around spreading the word about CCN’s work wherever we can and occasionally help with ferrying people/cats to the vet when there is a problem.

What we do to help CCN is a drop in the ocean and I only wish we could do more – but however insignificant “our bit” seems,  we hope perhaps it frees someone else to do the more important and vitally essential work which takes up so much of the team’s time.

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There are many ways to volunteer and support us to help the cats.  For more information, visit our volunteering page.  You can also join our “Helping Hands” Facebook group to keep updated of our various appeals.

 

Happy New Year from CCN

We would like to wish a happy new year to all of our supporters!

2014 has been a difficult year as we have come across many difficult cases and ill cats that needed to be euthanised.  Also, at the back of our minds are all the cats that we weren’t able to help, because of the lack of cooperation of some carers.  However, at the eve of the new year, we must look at the positive side of the work we do: all the cats we were able to help one way or another, all the good carers we have met, who were willing to take responsibility or put in the effort to make a project happen.

This year, we helped 755 cats and in December we reached the milestone of 2000 cats helped (in 2 and half years of existence).  This means that so much suffering has been prevented thanks to our TNR programme and the support and encouragements we receive from all of you.

It is not always easy and can be emotionally damaging and often we have thought to give it up.  Yet, we keep going and are already getting ready for another busy year.  Why?  Because we think that all cats are purrfect!

Enjoy the video and happy new year!